• Contact

    Let's Keep In Touch!X

    LEAVE A COMMENT

    Sending your message. Please wait...

    Thanks for sending your message! We'll get back to you shortly.

    There was a problem sending your message. Please try again.

    Please complete all the fields in the form before sending.

NEWS

Autoreguliertes Training #3 – RPE Interview mit Eric Helms

By Simon | In Interviews | on Oktober 9, 2016

 

In „Episode 1“ der Autoregulation-Series ging es zunächst um autoreguliertes Training im Allgemeinen, was sich dahinter verbirgt und wo generelle Vor- und Nachteile liegen können.

Darauf aufbauend wurde es im zweiten Teil etwas konkreter, in dem das APRE-System zeigen sollte, wie Autoregulation im Krafttraining tatsächlich aussehen kann.

Zwar gibt es noch weitere Wege, um sein Training zu autoregulieren (vielleicht schreibe ich noch mehr darüber, je nachdem, ob bei euch Interesse besteht), heute folgt nun jedoch die möglicherweise letzte Episode und damit der Abschluss dieser Reihe.

Das Thema: RPE (Ratings of Perceived Exertion) – die Autoregulierungsform mit dem wohl intensivsten wissenschaftlichen Background, die auch immer mehr Einzug im Kraftsport erhält.

Und was wäre besser, als direkt einen der führenden Experten auf dem Gebiet befragen zu können? Jep, zum Schluss gibt es nochmal etwas wirklich Besonderes: ein Interview mit Eric Helms!

Klick zur deutschen Version

 


 

Original Interview

Today I’m absolutely honored to bring you no other than the man himself, Eric Helms.

Eric is Co-Owner and Coach at 3D Muscle Journey, has a Bachelor’s degree in Fitness and Wellnes as well as two Master‘s degrees in exercise science and sports nutrition. He has published several peer reviewed articles in well known strength and nutrition journals, is author of two great books and also competes as a natural Pro-Bodybuilder and Powerlifter himself.

Currently he is pursuing his PhD in strength and conditioning at the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, specializing in the topic of autoregulation in strength training.

So I think it’s fair to say that he has succesfully established himself as one of the leading experts in the field these days.

eric-helms-profile


WIK

Eric, first of all, thank you very much for agreeing on doing this Interview with me. It’s a true honor to have you on and I think the readers will really appreciate it as well. But I’d suggest, let’s just dive right in!

The topic I’d like to talk about with you today is one that has received a lot of attention in the world of strength training lately and is also one that you’ve done quite some research on yourself – Autoregulation. And I’d like to especially focus one form of it, namely the use of ‚Ratings of Perceived exertion (RPE)‘.

Can you please tell us first what RPE actually is?

 

Eric

First off thank you for the kind words and thank you for having me!

RPE was originally developed nearly 50 years ago as a way to numerically quantify the perception of exertion in people exercising. In the course of conducting all this research, time and time again the investigators found that when a clearly described numerical scale was used, the ratings given during exercise closely matched the physiological stress that was imposed when it was measured objectively (lactate levels, workload performed, heart rate etc). Thus, it is now common practice in a variety of sports and exercise to use various types of RPE scores to both monitor training stress and sometimes to prescribe training.

 

WIK

Perfect!

So in the studies you yourself and your colleagues conducted on the topic, you tried to validate a novel RPE-scale, which could be used as an alternative to percentages in order to prescribe training intensity. However, if you look into the scientific literature you‘ll find that the concept of RPE is nothing really new and several different types of RPE-scales already exist.

Can’t we just use those in our training? Where did you see the necessity to conduct further research using a modified scale?

 

Eric

Great question! 

The original research on RPE used a scale designed for aerobic training. Some studies have found inconsistencies when using the traditional RPE scale to measure the intensity of effort in resistance training. Specifically, when using a 1-10 traditional RPE scale, three studies have found that, on average, a less than maximal RPE score (typically 8-9) is recorded even when exercisers take a set to muscular failure. This is odd, because in the context of a given set at a given load, it is not possible for the exerciser to have exposed themselves to more exertion (i.e. the set could not continue). The reason for this discrepancy is thought to be in the wording of the scale. The traditional RPE scales use descriptive wording such as “extremely difficult”, “very difficult”, “moderately difficult” etc., and while this is appropriate for continuous exercise, it misses the mark in resistance training for a specific reason.

That reason is what’s called “anchoring”. For someone to rate something subjectively as “difficult” or “easy”, it is always compared to some other experience, i.e. a previously “anchored” experience. So if the person ran the 400m sprint or a marathon previously, and is only given a broad description such as “extremely difficult” or “moderately difficult” to determine their RPE score, they will compare whatever they are rating to their prior experiences. Thus, while a 3 rep max might be difficult, it might not get rated as a 10 (despite it being a 3 rep MAX) because they are comparing to something they feel felt was harder in their past. To get around this, I helped to validate a scale that has been in use in the powerlifting community for almost a decade now.

Mike Tuscherer, founder of Reactive Training Systems, is a world champion powerlifter, coach and author who developed a unique RPE scale based specifically on how many repetitions remain at the conclusion of a set. For example, a 10 RPE means you could not have performed any further repetitions, nor could you have done the same number of reps with a heavier load.  A 9 RPE means you could have done 1 more repetition, an 8 RPE 2 more repetitions, and onward. This scale has anchoring, specific to resistance training, built in, and thus it is thought to be a better tool to use for determining exertion in weightlifting.

In fact, back in 2012 a research group lead by Hackett found that estimating how many more repetitions you could perform before hitting failure was a more accurate way to assess resistance training intensity of effort than traditional RPE. Thus, Dr. Zourdos and his team at FAU and myself and my colleagues at AUT have been collaborating since 2013 in this area of research.

 

rpe-rir-englisch

The novel RPE scale based on ‚Reps in Reserve (RIR)‘ we were just talking about. The values describe how many reps could’ve been performed in a given set before reaching failure.

 

WIK

And in these studies, what were the main findings and what are the practical implications we can take from them?

 

Eric

Our findings suggest that lifters can be quite accurate at using RPE to determine their intensity of effort when lifting. The primary elements that influence accuracy are as follows:

 

  1. RPE accuracy improves the closer you get to failure. It is more difficult to determine when you are 5 reps away from failure than when you are 3 reps from failure and it is more difficult to determine when you are 3 reps from failure than when you are 1 rep from failure.
  2. RPE accuracy improves with training experience. People with years of experience lifting have significantly more accuracy at rating RPE than those with just months under their belt. Having experienced going to and near failure repeatedly helps anchor that experience and likely improves accuracy.
  3. How many repetitions are performed in a set may also have an inverse relationship with RPE accuracy when you aren’t very close to failure. Meaning, if you are doing a 20RM set of squats, you might have a harder time determining when you have 3 or 5 repetitions remaining compared to when you are doing an 8RM set of squats. The local muscular fatigue and cardiovascular fatigue likely inflates RPE, when in reality you could still grind out a few more reps than you thought possible.

 

eric-helms-squat

 

WIK

Even though people like Mike and yourself continuously try to explan what RPE is and what it isn’t, sometimes it seems like people assume RPE will do something magical for them. It’s supposed to pack on 20kg on their Squat in 3 Weeks, solve all their programming issues and also make their bank accout grow (or something like that). I’m not sure why this is, maybe it’s simply because it can be a bit of a confusing concept in the beginning.

However, what do you think the benefits of autoregulating one‘s training using RPE actually are? Where do you see the primary advantages in comparison to using a percentage based program?

 

Eric

Very true. Training with RPE has a mystique about it and I think sometimes people have unrealistic expectations or think RPE based training is a specific type of training or unique training system. In reality, it’s simply way to autoregulate and individualize loading and nothing more. With that said, it’s still a pretty useful tool.

The main benefit is that you are better able to ensure that the program you are following is stressing you as intended. For example, some people can do 8 reps with 70% of their 1RM, other people can literally do 16 reps! That means prescribing 3 x 8 at 70% of 1RM might be incredibly easy for one person and next to impossible for another person, despite the fact that the load prescription is supposed to be the same! Obviously this would also effect some adaptations such as strength development and/or muscular endurance. You could end up creating much more physical stress, muscle damage, psychological strain and burnout than intended if the person was hitting failure on every set, and on the other hand you might not be stressing the person nearly as much as intended if they had another 8 reps in the tank after each set.

Prescribing an RPE value (or range) in place of, or alongside the sets, reps and percentage 1RM, allows the person to adjust the load to ensure it matches the intended stress. Thus, load is adjusted to the individual more accurately and the program’s intended stress more accurately matches the experienced stress.

 

WIK

So that means we actually don’t have to always decide between using either RPE or percentages, when setting up our training intensities?

 

Eric

That you have to choose either or is in fact a common misconception. I personally actually like to prescribe both concurrently!

There are some cool things we’ve found out through research. One of them is that for every RPE value over or under the target RPE value, the load could be decreased or increased ~4% respectively and this would get you to a load value much closer to what the weight should have been at that RPE target.

For example, let’s say the goal was to do 5 repetitions at an 8 RPE. You thought 100kg for 5 repetitions would result in an 8 RPE. However, upon completion of your 5th repetition, you rate the set at a 7 RPE. Well, you would increase the load by 4%, to 104, and the next set of 5 will likely be much closer to an 8 RPE (assuming you rested fully between sets, and accurately rated the 7 RPE in the first place).

So I personally like to use percentage 1RM and RPE in conjunction, as I feel they are actually sub sets of intensity. One is intensity of load (percentage 1RM), and the other is intensity of effort (RPE). You can use RPE alone or percentage 1RM alone, but some things need to be in place for either to be an optimal approach. When using only RPE, the lifter needs to be both experienced, objective and also willing to challenge him or herself, but in a reasonable way. When using only percentage of 1RM, you need to have a good idea of your capacity to perform repetitions at various percentages of 1RM. As previously stated, some people can do 8 reps at 70%, and some 16, so you need to know where you fall on this spectrum to prescribe percentages that are appropriate.

 

WIK

Now, just like everything else, certainly the use of RPE has its limitations as well. For example, there is some evidence to suggest (here and here) – and this is something I’ve found with a few of my clients as well – that in some cases people are not that great at estimating their own efforts. And since RPE bascially requires just that, prescribing intensities via percentages might work better under some circumstances.

What’s your take on that? Maybe you could just give us a little insight on what some drawbacks of using RPE might be or what things are that people should be aware of when trying to implement it.

 

Eric

These are two perfect examples of the points I’ve made. The second study by Hackett is the one I mentioned previously, where they found that repetitions in reserve (RIR) at the end of a set was more accurate than traditional RPE at predicting intensity. This comes down to anchoring, RIR is likely a better anchor for resistance training than the descriptors used in traditional RPE scales.

The first study is an example of poor anchoring. When you use untrained people, they may or may not have appropriately anchored previous exercise experience to compare to what they are rating. In this case, there were no anchoring sessions prior to the study, there was not a requirement for training age, and thus unsurprisingly, the subjects were not able to estimate their intensity of effort very accurately. It is important to practice using the scale AND to have a couple years of serious lifting under your belt so you know what training to and near failure feel like to be able to accurately use the repetitions in reserve based scale.

eric-helms-curl

 

WIK

Is there anything we can do to improve this skill so we can use RPE effectively in the future?

 

Eric

Certainly! Practice makes perfect first off. To start, even though novices can’t accurately gauge RPE, I do think they should use it. Not to prescribe load, but just to give a rating after each set. They can start by using percentage of 1RM, and then after each set look at the RIR based RPE scale and write down the RPE they think it was to gain familiarity.

Additionally, they can ask feedback from someone experienced with the scale and with lifting to see how they match up. If they find they consistently under rate their RPE (I could have done 3 more reps bro!!) then they should try recording their sets on a phone, and then looking at the video of themselves before rating their RPE. In my personal experience, when people like this see how slow the bar was moving, they are less likely to convince themselves they could have done more. On the other hand, for people who are too conservative, it’s not a bad idea to incorporate plus sets, or AMRAPs. If you did your 3×8 at 70% and each set felt like a 9-10 RPE yet you completed the first two sets without needing to reduce the load, maybe take the last set to failure. It may be that you just don’t know what failure feels like so you don’t know when you are near it and you would benefit from seeing how many reps you are able to get. If you bang out 15 reps, now you know what going to failure actually feels like and you can look back and realize that the first two sets were RPE 4’s not 9’s and you will rate sets more accurately in the future. In this case video can also help as the fast bar speed can help conservative raters realize it wasn’t as hard as it felt.

 

WIK

Okay, now let’s really try to get concrete here, so we can get an better understanding of how using RPE in the gym might actually look like.

If you first introduce someone to the concept and plan on implementing it into their training – how do you usually go about that, so the implementation becomes a success?

 

Eric

I like to give someone a block of training, say 8 weeks where they use percentage 1RM exclusively, but record RPE after each set. I also ask to see their heaviest sets each week in video form and include some AMRAPs. This way I can assess their ability to accurately rate RPE, their capacity to perform repetitions at different percentage 1RMs (typically 80-95%) and get their feedback on how accurate they feel they are and whether they do or don’t enjoy rating their RPE (some people get frustrated or over think it).

Based on that, we can move to the next stage. If they were super accurate, and didn’t mind using RPE scores, I’ll incorporate RPE into their training as an adjunct to adjust loads when the RPE doesn’t match the expected intensity of effort based on percentage 1RM. Thus, they don’t get crushed when they are less recovered than I expect, and they don’t easily crush it when I expect them to be overreaching.

On the other hand, if their ability to rate RPE is poor (based on my video assessment and AMRAP outcomes), I’ll have them give it another go with rating RPE only after their own video assessment. This normally works great if they just aren’t good at rating RPE, but doesn’t fix the issue if it’s an ego or fear related reason. In those cases where emotion gets in the way, I just stick with percentage 1RM. However, I use their AMRAPs to better customize what percentages I use. For example, if someone can do 12 reps with 80% of 1RM, I won’t be prescribing sets of 6 and expecting those sets to be 2 repetitions from failure like they are on average; instead I woild use a higher percentage of 1RM to more accurately match their ability to perform repetitions at this intensity of load.

 

WIK

Is there anything that would be different when using RPE for Bodybuilding- vs. Powerlifting-specific Training?

 

Eric

No there wouldn’t, because RPE is just a way of prescribing the intensity of effort. The training itself would be different, and specific to the goal, but the RPE scale would remain the same. However, in some cases percentage of 1RM is not appropriate. Obviously you won’t use a 1RM test on something like a bicep curl or other accessory movements, so you might ONLY use RPE on these types of movements.

 

eric-helms-deadlift

 

WIK

Alright Eric, let’s bring this thing home.

As far as I know, you are currently working on another project regarding RPE in order to get your PhD. Is there anything you can tell us about that work yet?

 

Eric

I’m actually well into a study comparing 8 weeks of training in trained males performing squats and bench press three days a week, identical in all ways of exercise prescription, except one group is using RPE to select their loads, while the other group is using percentage of 1RM.

We are measuring 1RM strength before and after, muscle thickness, body fat, and stress and readiness levels to see if there are any differences. We have only had about a fifth of the subjects finish the study thus far, but we are scheduled to complete the study end of November. At that point I will be able to speak to the results, so stay tuned!

 

WIK

Eric, thank you very much again for taking the time to answer all these questions. I really appreciate it and hope you’ll join me again in the future!

If someone wants to read more of Eric’s knowledge bombs, is interested in working with him or wants to send him some awesome bathroom-selfies, go and check out his website 3DMJ and all of his social media:

 

www.3dmusclejourney.com

www.muscleandstrengthpyramids.com

www.youtube.com/team3dmj

https://www.facebook.com/ericrhelms

www.instagram.com/helms3dmj/

https://www.researchgate.net/Eric_Helms

 


 

Deutsche Version

Heute habe ich die Ehre, euch niemand geringeres vorstellen zu dürfen als Eric Helms.

Eric ist Mitgründer von und Coach bei 3D Muscle Journey, hat einen Bachelor in Fitness und Wellness und zwei Master-Abschlüsse der Sportwissenschaft und -ernährung. Er hat mehrere durch Peer-Review geprüfte Artikel in bekannten Journals veröffentlicht, ist Autor zweier super Bücher im Bereich Krafttraining und Ernährung und selbst als naturaler Profi-Bodybuilder und Kraftdreikämpfer aktiv.

Derzeit arbeitet er an seinem Doktor im Bereich „Strength and Conditioning“ an der University of Technology, New Zealand, in dem er sich auf Autoregulation im Kraftsport spezialisiert.

Ich denke, es ist also durchaus berechtigt zu sagen, dass er sich erfolgreich als einer der führenden Experten in der Industrie etabliert hat.

eric-helms-profile


WIK

Eric, vorab vielen Dank dafür, dass du dich zu diesem Interview bereit erklärt hast. Es ist mir wirklich eine Ehre und ich denke, auch die Leser werden das sehr zu schätzen wissen. Aber ich würde vorschlagen, lass‘ uns direkt durchstarten!

Das Thema, über das ich heute gerne mit dir sprechen würde, ist eines, das in der Welt des Kraftsports in der letzten Zeit viel Aufmerksamkeit erfahren hat und an dem du derzeit selbst forschst – Autoregulation. Und ich würde mich dabei gerne auf vor allem eine Form der Autoregulation fokussieren, nämlich die des Einsatzes von ‚Ratings of Perceived exertion (RPE)‘.

Könntest du uns zunächst erklären, was RPE überhaupt ist?

 

Eric

Auch an dich erst einmal vielen Dank für die netten Worte und dass du dieses Interview mit mir führen möchtest!

RPE wurde ursprünglich vor 50 Jahren als eine Methode entwickelt, um das Belastungsempfinden von Personen während des Sporttreibens zahlenmäßig zu quantifizieren. Im Verlauf der Forschung auf diesem Gebiet hat sich wiederholt gezeigt, dass das Belastungsempfinden der Person während der Aktivität, das durch eine klar definierte, nummerierte Skala bewertet wurde, dem objektiv gemessenen physiologischen Stress (Laktatwerte, Trainingsumfang, Herzfrequenz etc.) sehr gut entsprach.

Daher ist es in vielen verschiedenen Sportarten heute gängig, unterschiedliche Typen von RPE einzusetzen, um die Trainingsbelastung damit zu kontrollieren und manchmal sogar auch zu planen.

 

WIK

In den Studien, die du und deine Kollegen durchgeführt haben, habt ihr versucht, eine neuartige RPE Skala zu validieren, die als Alternative zu Prozenten des 1RM verwendet werden könnte, um die Intensität im Training zu planen. Beim Blick in die bereits vorhandene Literatur zum Thema wird allerdings klar, dass RPE eigentlich kein neues Konzept ist und es bereits mehrere verschiedene RPE Skalen gibt.

Können wir nicht einfach die in unserem Training verwenden? Wo sahst du die Notwendigkeit, weitere Forschungen mit einer modifizierten Skala anzustellen?

 

Eric

Sehr gute Frage!

Die früheren Studien zu RPE haben eine Skala verwendet, die speziell für aerobes Training gedacht war. Wurde diese traditionelle RPE Skala dann im Krafttraining genutzt, um zu messen, wie hart sich ein Satz angefühlt hat („intensity of effort“), kam es in einigen Studien zu widersprüchlichen Ergebnissen.

Insbesondere gib es drei Studien, die eine traditionelle RPE Skala von 1-10 verwendet und dabei im Durchschnitt herausgefunden haben, dass selbst beim Ausführen eines Satzes bis zum Muskelversagen ein weniger als maximaler (sprich 8-9) Wert angegeben wurde. Das ist seltsam, denn der Sportler hätte in diesem Satz und mit diesem Gewicht unmöglich noch mehr in den Satz reinlegen können (er konnte den Satz schließlich nicht mehr weiterführen). Es wird angenommen, dass der Grund für diese Abweichung in der Wortwahl der Tabelle liegt. Die traditionelle RPE Skala benutzt Beschreibungen wie z.B. „extrem schwer“, „sehr schwer“, „moderat schwer“ usw. Und während das für Ausdaueraktivitäten durchaus angemessen ist, gibt es einen speziellen Grund dafür, weshalb das für das Krafttraining nicht zielführend ist.

Und dieser Grund lautet: „Ankerpunkt“. Wenn jemand etwas subjektiv als „schwer“ oder „leicht“ beschreiben soll, dann gibt derjenige diese Einschätzung immer unter Berücksichtigung anderer Erfahrungen ab, sprich, er orientiert sich bei seiner Bewertung an einer früheren, „verankerten“ Erfahrung. Sagen wir, ein Sportler ist vor einiger Zeit die 400m gelaufen oder hat bei einem Marathon mitgemacht und jetzt soll er irgendetwas mit einer RPE bewerten. Werden ihm für diese Bewertung lediglich grobe Beschreibungen wie „extrem schwer“ oder „moderat schwer“ vorgelegt, dann wird er sich bei dieser Einschätzung immer an vorherigen Erfahrungen orientieren. Während beispielsweise ein 3RM (3 Wiederholungs-Maximum) durchaus hart sein kann, ist es möglich, dass dieser Satz nicht mit einer 10 bewertet wird (obwohl es sich um ein 3 WiederholungsMAXIMUM handelt), weil der Satz mit einer vergangenen Belastung verglichen wird, die als noch härter empfunden wurde. Um dieses Problem zu lösen, habe ich bei der Validierung einer Skala mitgeholfen, die in der Kraftdreikampf-Szene mittlerweile bereits seit fast einem Jahrzehnt zum Einsatz kommt.

Mike Tuchscherer, Gründer des Reactive Training Systems, ist Coach, Autor und selbst Kraftdreikämpfer auf Weltklasse-Niveau. Mike hat eine einzigartige RPE Skala entwickelt, die darauf basiert, wie viele Wiederholungen am Ende eines Satzes noch hätten ausgeführt werden können. Ein Wert von 10 bedeutet z.B., dass man weder eine weitere Wiederholung, noch die gleiche Anzahl an Wiederholungen mit mehr Gewicht hätte absolvieren können. Ein Wert von RPE 9 bedeutet, man hätte noch eine weitere Wiederholung schaffen können, ein Wert von 8, man hätte noch zwei weitere Wiederholungen schaffen können usw. Diese Skala bietet nun einen solchen Ankerpunkt, der speziell für das Krafttraining angepasst wurde und scheint damit besser geeignet, um das Maß an Anstrengung in diesem Sport zu bestimmen.

Und tatsächlich hat 2012 eine Forschergruppe unter Hackett herausgefunden, dass das Schätzen der „verbleibenden Wiederholungen bis zum Muskelversagen (Reps in Reserve)“ eine präzisere Methode als der Gebrauch einer traditionellen RPE Skala darstellt, um zu bestimmten, wie hart sich ein Satz angefühlt hat. Aus diesem Grund arbeiten Dr. Zourdos und sein Team an der FAU und ich mit meinen Kollegen an der AUT seit 2013 zusammen auf diesem Forschungsgebiet.

 

rpe-rir-deutsch

Die modifizierte RPE Skala basierend auf ‚Reps in Reserve (RIR)‘, um die es gerade geht. Die Werte drücken aus, wie viele Wdh. man in einem Satz noch hätte absolvieren können, bevor man ein Muskelversagen erreicht.

 

WIK

Was waren die wesentlichen Ergebnisse, die bei diesen Studien herauskamen? Und welche praktische Bedeutung haben die für uns?

 

Eric

Unsere Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass Kraftsportler ziemlich gut darin sind, ihren Grad an Anstrengung mithilfe von RPE einzuschätzen. Die wesentlichen Faktoren, die die Genauigkeit dieser Einschätzung beeinflussen, sind: 

 

  1. Die Genauigkeit der RPE Werte verbessert sich, je näher bis zum Muskelversagen trainiert wird. In einem Satz abzuschätzen, ob man noch 5 Wiederholungen im Tank hat, ist schwieriger als abzuschätzen, ob man noch 3 Wiederholungen hätte schaffen können. Und in einem Satz zu sagen, ob man noch 3 Wiederholungen vom Muskelversagen entfernt ist, ist schwieriger als zu schätzen, ob man nur noch 1 Wiederholung davon entfernt ist. 
  2. Die Genauigkeit der RPE Werte verbessert sich mit zunehmender Trainingserfahrung. Sportler mit jahrelanger Erfahrung im Krafttraining sind deutlich besser darin einen genauen RPE Wert abzugeben als diejenigen, die gerade erst seit ein paar Monaten dabei sind. Wenn man in der Vergangenheit wiederholt bis und nahe zum Muskelversagen trainiert hat, weiß man, wie sich das anfühlt und das verschafft schließlich einen Ankerpunkt, der eine genauere Schätzung ermöglicht.
  3. Die Genauigkeit der RPE scheint außerdem abzunehmen, je mehr Wiederholungen in einem Satz absolviert werden und je weiter man vom Muskelversagen entfernt ist. Sprich, bei einem 20RM Satz in der Kniebeuge zu sagen, wann man sich noch 3 oder 5 Wiederholungen vor Erreichen des Muskelversagens befindet, ist eher schwieriger als das in einem 8RM Satz zu tun. Die lokale Ermüdung des Muskels und die des Herz-Kreislauf-Systems kann den RPE Wert nach oben drücken, obwohl man eigentlich noch ein paar mehr Wiederholungen rausquetschen könnte als angenommen.

 

eric-helms-squat

WIK

Obwohl Leute wie Mike und du permanent versuchen, zu erklären, was RPE ist und was es nicht ist, kommt es mir manchmal so vor, als ob einige Leute irgendetwas Magisches von RPE erwarten. Es soll die Kniebeugeleistung in 3 Wochen um 20kg erhöhen, alle Probleme mit der Trainingsplanung beseitigen und am besten auch noch den Kontostand steigen lassen (oder sowas Ähnliches). Ich weiß nicht genau, woher diese Annahme kommt, vielleicht liegt es aber einfach daran, dass das ganze Konzept von RPE zu Beginn etwas verwirrend sein kann.

Wie auch immer – was denkst du, wo die eigentlichen Vorteile liegen, wenn jemand sein Training mithilfe der modifizierten RPE Skala autoreguliert? Wo siehst du die wesentlichen Vorzüge im Vergleich zu einem prozentbasierten Training?

 

Eric

Das ist wohl wahr. Mit RPE zu trainieren scheint etwas Mystisches an sich zu haben und ich glaube, die Leute haben manchmal entweder schlichtweg unrealistische Erwartungen oder meinen, RPE sei eine spezifische Trainingsform oder ein einzigartiges Trainingssystem. Dabei ist es in Wirklichkeit einfach nur eine Möglichkeit, um die verwendeten Gewichte zu autoregulieren und individuell anzupassen – nicht mehr, nicht weniger. Nichtsdestotrotz ist es ein sehr nützliches Tool.

Der wesentliche Vorteil besteht darin, dass man auf diese Art und Weise besser sicherstellen kann, dass einen das Trainingsprogramm auch wirklich so fordert, wie man es geplant hat. Beispielsweise gibt es Athleten, die können 8 Wiederholungen mit 70% ihres 1RM absolvieren, während andere sogar 16 schaffen! Das heißt, gibt man einem Sportler nun 3 x 8 bei 70% 1RM vor, könnte das für den einen super leicht und für den anderen sogar schier unmöglich zu bewältigen sein, obwohl die vorgegebene Last dieselbe sein soll! Das würde logischerweise auch einen Einfluss auf einige Anpassungen wie die Kraftentwicklung und/oder muskuläre Ausdauer haben. Trainiert eine Person also in jedem Satz bis zum Versagen, könnte  man am Ende deutlich mehr physischen Stress, Muskelschäden, psychologische Belastung und Burnout erzeugen als geplant. Auf der anderen Seite ist es möglich, dass man jemanden gar nicht so sehr belastet wie man eigentlich vorhat, wenn derjenige in jedem Satz noch 8 Wiederholungen im Tank hat. Gibt man nun allerdings einen RPE Wert (oder eine RPE Spanne) statt oder in Kombination mit den Sätzen, Wiederholungen und Prozenten an, kann die Person die Gewichte immer so anpassen, dass die Belastung auch ausfällt wie sie soll. Das heißt, die Gewichte lassen sich insgesamt deutlich genauer an das jeweilige Individuum anpassen und die geplante Belastung stimmt wesentlich besser mit der Belastung überein, die die Person am Ende tatsächlich erfährt.

 

WIK

Das heißt, wir müssen uns gar nicht immer entweder für RPE oder Prozente entscheiden, wenn wir unsere Trainingsintensität festlegen wollen?

 

Eric

Das man sich für das eine oder das andere entscheiden müsse, ist in der Tat eine häufige Fehleinschätzung. Ich persönlich z.B. bevorzuge es, beide zusammen anzugeben! Da gibt es einige coole Sachen, die wir in der Forschung herausgefunden haben. Eine davon ist, dass man für jeden RPE Wert, der über- oder unterhalb des Zielwertes liegt, das Gewicht um 4% reduzieren bzw. erhöhen kann und im Anschluss ein Gewicht findet, dass dem eigentlich angestrebten RPE Wert deutlich näher kommen sollte.

Nehmen wir also beispielsweise an, dein Ziel für den Tag sei es, 5 Wiederholungen bei einer RPE 8 zu absolvieren und du schätzt, 100kg seien dafür die richtige Last. Jetzt merkst du nach Wiederholung 5 allerdings, dass der Satz eigentlich einer RPE 7 entspricht. Hebst du das Gewicht folglich um 4% auf 104kg an, sollte der nächste Satz tatsächlich deutlich eher den geplanten Wert von 8 erreichen (unter der Annahme, dass du nach dem vorherigen Satz genug pausiert hast und dein notierter Wert von RPE 7 im ersten Satz auch wirklich akkurat war).

Ich persönlich mag die Angabe sowohl von Prozenten vom 1RM als auch von RPEs, weil ich denke, dass beide eigentlich Unterformen der Intensität darstellen. Das eine beschreibt die Intensität des Gewichts (% vom 1RM) und das andere, wie sehr man sich in einem Satz ins Zeug legt (RPE). Man kann natürlich auch nur Prozente oder nur RPE Werte angeben, damit das optimal funktioniert, müssen allerdings bestimmte Faktoren gegeben sein. Arbeitet man lediglich mit RPE, muss der Sportler nicht nur erfahren und objektiv, sondern auch dazu bereit sein, sich selbst in angemessenem Maße zu fordern. Setzt man hingegen nur auf Prozente, muss man gut darüber Bescheid wissen, wie viele Wiederholungen man bei verschiedenen Prozenten des 1RM auszuführen in der Lage ist. Wie zuvor erwähnt, gibt es Personen, die 8 und manche, die 16 Wiederholungen mit 70% ausführen können – um die korrekten Prozentwerte zu wählen, wäre es also notwendig zu wissen, wo man sich selbst in diesem Spektrum befindet.

 

WIK

So wie vermutlich bei allem anderen auch, gibt es sicherlich auch beim Einsatz von RPE gewisse Einschränkungen. Beispielsweise gibt es Evidenz dafür (hier and hier) – und das ist etwas, dass ich auch bei einigen meiner eigenen Klienten beobachten konnte – dass manche Personen in manchen Situationen nicht sonderlich gut darin sind, ihren eigenen Einsatz zu bewerten. Und weil es bei RPE ja gerade darum geht, eine solche Einschätzung zu treffen, könnten Prozentwerte zur Festlegung der Trainingsintensität in einigen Fällen evtl. besser funktionieren.

Wie denkst du darüber? Vielleicht kannst du uns einfach einen Einblick in die Nachteile von RPE geben oder erläutern, was bestimmte Dinge sind, die man im Kopf behalten sollte, möchte man RPE in das eigene Training integrieren. 

 

Eric

Das sind zwei perfekte Beispiele für die Argumente, die ich vorhin angebracht habe. Die zweite Studie von Hackett ist die, in der herausgefunden wurde, dass die Angabe von „Repetitions in Reserve“ (RIR – verbleibende Wiederholungen bis zum Muskelversagen) eine genauere Methode zur Vorhersage der Intensität darstellte als der Einsatz einer traditionellen RPE Skala. Der Grund dafür ist, wie gesagt, dass die Angabe eines RPE Wertes basierend auf RIR vermutlich einen besseren Ankerpunkt liefert als die wenig konkrete Wortwahl der traditionellen RPE Skalen.  

Die erste Studie ist ein Beispiel dafür, was passiert, wenn es keinen guten solchen Ankerpunkt gibt. Zwar können natürlich auch untrainierte Personen vergangene Erfahrungen gemacht haben, die sie dann zum Vergleich mit anderen Belastungen heranziehen können, das muss aber nicht der Fall sein. Im Fall dieser Studie gab es weder Trainingseinheiten vor den Tests, die einen solchen Ankerpunkt hätten bereitstellen können, noch gab es Voraussetzungen bzgl. der Trainingserfahrung. Somit waren die Probanden, ziemlich wenig überraschend, auch nicht sonderlich gut darin, ihren eigenen Einsatz zu schätzen. Es ist wichtig, dass man den Umgang mit der Skala übt UND bereits ein paar Jahre im Krafttraining verbracht hat. Denn nur so kann man wissen, wie sich das Training bis und nahe zum Muskelversagen eigentlich anfühlt und die RPE Skala basierend auf RIR auch effektiv anwenden.

eric-helms-curl

 

WIK

Aber gibt es denn etwas, das wir tun können, um diese Fähigkeit der Einschätzung zu verbessern, sodass wir RPE in Zukunft effektiv einsetzen können?

 

Eric

Auf jeden Fall! Als allererstes gilt: Übung macht den Meister. Selbst Anfänger sollten meiner Ansicht nach RPEs benutzen, obwohl sie noch nicht dazu in der Lage sind, genaue Einschätzungen abzugeben. Allerdings hat RPE an dieser Stelle noch nicht den Zweck, die Trainingsgewichte zu bestimmen, sondern es geht erstmal darum, mit der RPE Skala basierend auf RIR vertraut zu werden. Dazu können Beginner jeden Satz einfach mit einer RPE bewerten, auch wenn das Training noch auf Prozenten basiert. 

Zusätzlich können sie jemanden um Feedback bitten, der bereits Erfahrung im Krafttraining und im Umgang mit der Skala hat und schauen, inwieweit deren Einschätzung mit der eigenen übereinstimmt. Wenn sich dabei zeigt, dass sie kontinuierlich zu geringe RPE Werte abgeben („Ich hätte locker noch 3 Wiederholungen machen können, bro!!!“), dann sollten sie sich am besten selbst auf Video aufnehmen und erst nach Anschauen des Clips einen Wert notieren. Wenn sie selbst sehen, wie langsam sich die Hantel eigentlich bewegt hat, sind sie meiner Erfahrung nach anschließend deutlich weniger davon überzeugt, dass sie noch mehr Wiederholungen hätten ausführen können. Hat man auf der anderen Seite mit jemandem zu tun, der kontinuierlich zu konservative Wertungen abgibt, ist es keine schlechte Idee, Plus-Sätze oder AMRAPs ins Training einzubauen. Angenommen, du führst 3×8 bei 70% aus und bewertest jeden Satz mit einer RPE 9-10, obwohl du das Gewicht in keinem der Sätze reduzieren musstest. An dieser Stelle wäre es sinnvoll, den letzten Satz bis zum Muskelversagen auszuführen, um zu sehen, wie viele Wiederholungen du tatsächlich zu absolvieren in der Lage bist. Denn es ist gut möglich, dass du einfach noch nicht weißt, wie sich wirkliches Muskelversagen anfühlt und dementsprechend auch nicht einschätzen kannst, wann du dich in der Nähe davon befindest. Haust du im letzten Satz jetzt 15 Wiederholungen raus, dann wird dir bewusst, wie sich Training bis zur Erschöpfung wirklich anfühlt. Rückblickend lagen die RPE Werte aus den ersten beiden Sätzen also eigentlich nicht bei 9, sondern bei 4 und du solltest von da an in der Lage sein, zukünftige Sätze besser einzuschätzen. Auch in solchen Fällen kann es hilfreich sein, sich selbst aufzunehmen – sieht man im Video, wie schnell sich die Hantel wirklich bewegt hat, wird einem bewusst, dass der Satz vielleicht doch gar nicht so hart war, wie er sich angefühlt hat.

 

WIK

Okay, lass‘ uns jetzt einmal wirklich konkret werden, damit wir eine bessere Vorstellung davon bekommen, wie der Einsatz von RPE in unserem Training aussehen könnte. 

Wenn du jemanden zum ersten mal mit dem Konzept der RPE Skala vertraut machen möchtest – wie gehst du da üblicherweise vor, damit das Ganze ein Erfolg wird?

 

Eric

Meistens plane ich für so jemanden einen mehrwöchigen Trainingsblock (z.B. 8 Wochen), in dem die Trainingsgewichte zwar vorerst auf Prozentwerten basieren, ich dem Athleten aber die Aufgabe gebe, nach jedem Satz einen RPE Wert zu notieren. Außerdem bitte ich sie darum, mir ihren schwersten Satz auf Video zuzuschicken und baue ein paar AMRAP-Sätze in ihr Training ein. Dadurch kann ich sowohl ihr Können in der Einschätzung der RPEs als auch ihre Fähigkeit, Wiederholungen bei bestimmten Prozentwerten (meist bei 80-95%) auszuführen, beurteilen. Gleichzeitig können mir die Leute Feedback geben, für wie akkurat sie ihre notierten Werte selbst halten und ob ihnen das gesamte Training mithilfe der Skala gefällt oder nicht (manche machen sich z.B. zu viele Gedanken oder werden dadurch entmutigt).

Darauf aufbauend können wir dann in die nächste Phase übergehen. Wenn der Sportler immer super genaue Schätzungen abgeben konnte und keinerlei Probleme damit hatte, die Skala zu benutzen, baue ich RPE von da an zusätzlich in das Training ein. Dadurch können die Athleten die geplanten Lasten anpassen, sollten sich die Gewichte mal härter oder weniger hart anfühlen als sie sollen. Auf diese Art und Weise zerbrechen sie nicht an den Gewichten, sollten sie weniger erholt sein als ich dachte, noch sind die Gewichte viel zu leicht, wenn ich eigentlich vorhabe, die Sportler am bzw. leicht über ihrem Limit trainieren zu lassen.

Kommt jemand auf der anderen Seite nicht gut mit dem Einsatz von RPE zurecht und bewertet seine Sätze ungenau (basierend auf dem, was ich in den Videos sehe und wie die AMRAPs ausfallen), dann gebe ich ihnen nochmal die Gelegenheit RPE Werte abzugeben, jedoch erst, nachdem sie ihre eigenen Videos angesehen haben. Normalerweise funktioniert das sehr gut, sollten sie einfach nur ein Defizit in der akkuraten Einschätzung der RPEs haben. Weniger gut funktioniert das hingegen, wenn sich das Problem auf Ängste oder ein zu großes Ego zurückführen lässt. In solchen Fällen, in denen Emotionen überhandnehmen, bleibe ich bei einem prozentbasierten Ansatz. Allerdings nutze ich dann die AMRAP-Sätze, um die Festlegung der Prozentwerte zu verbessern. Kann ein Athlet beispielsweise 12 Wiederholungen mit 80% 1RM ausführen, dann werde ich keine 6 Wiederholungen einplanen und erwarten, dass die Sätze 2 Wiederholungen vom Muskelversagen entfernt beendet werden (wie es vielleicht üblicherweise der Fall wäre). Stattdessen würde ich einen höheren Prozentwert ansetzen, um die Fähigkeit, mehrere Wiederholungen bei diesem Gewicht auszuführen als üblich, zu berücksichtigen.

 

WIK

Gibt es irgendwelche Unterschiede im Gebrauch von RPE, wenn sich jemand spezifischer auf das Bodybuilding- oder Kraftdreikampf-Training fokussiert? 

 

Eric

Nein, da gäbe es keine Unterschiede. RPE ist einfach nur eine Methode, um festzulegen, wie sehr sich jemand in einem Satz anstrengen soll. Das Training an sich wäre zwar schon verschieden, eben spezifisch ausgerichtet auf das jeweilige Ziel, aber die RPE Skala bliebe unverändert.

Es gibt allerding einige Fälle, bei denen die Planung basierend auf Prozenten unangebracht wäre. Beispielsweise würde man keinen 1RM-Test in einer Übung wie dem Bizepscurl oder in einer anderen Isolationsübung ausführen. Hier wäre also sogar der ALLEINIGE Einsatz von RPE sinnvoll. 

 

eric-helms-deadlift

WIK

Alles klar Eric, es wird Zeit, das wir zum Abschluss kommen.

Soweit ich weiß, arbeitest du momentan an einem weiteren Projekt, das mit RPE  zu tun hat, um deinen Doktortitel zu erlangen. Gibt es da schon etwas, dass du uns verraten kannst?

 

Eric

Ich bin aktuell sogar schon relativ weit mit einer Studie zugange, in der wir zwei Gruppen trainierter, männlicher Kraftdreikämpfer miteinander vergleichen, die für 8 Wochen lang drei mal pro Woche Kniebeugen und Bankdrücken absolvieren. Der einzige Unterschied zwischen den Gruppen besteht darin, dass die einen RPE und die anderen Prozente ihres 1RM benutzen, um ihre Trainingsgewichte zu bestimmen. 

Wir messen dabei deren 1RM-Werte, Muskeldicke, Körperfettanteil, Stress- und Bereitschaftslevel vorher und nachher, um zu schauen, ob es irgendwelche Differenzen zwischen den Gruppen gibt. Bisher haben ungefähr nur ein Fünftel der Probanden die Studie beendet, aber wir planen, die Studie bis Ende November durchzubekommen. Dann kann ich auch mehr über die Ergebnisse erzählen, also bleibt gespannt!

 

WIK

Eric, nochmal vielen Dank dafür, dass du dir die Zeit genommen und all meine Fragen beantwortet hast. Das weiß ich wirklich sehr zu schätzen und hoffe natürlich, auch in Zukunft mal wieder mit der quatschen zu dürfen!


Wenn jemand mehr über Eric wissen, mit ihm zusammen arbeiten oder ihm coole Badezimmer-Selfies zuschicken möchte, der kann seine Webseite 3DMJ und am besten auch gleich alle seine anderen Social Media Kanäle abchecken: 

 

www.3dmusclejourney.com

www.muscleandstrengthpyramids.com

www.youtube.com/team3dmj

https://www.facebook.com/ericrhelms

www.instagram.com/helms3dmj/

https://www.researchgate.net/Eric_Helms

 

(Visited 1.095 times, 2 visits today)

One Comment to "Autoreguliertes Training #3 – RPE Interview mit Eric Helms"

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

"If you're going to try, go all the way" - Charles Bukowski
Wissen Ist Kraft 2017       Wer bin ich?       Und was will ich?       Impressum